The City by the Bay

I just came back from five days in San Francisco, where I went to attend the opening of an exhibition of my work I Still Do and Sea of Dreams.

copyright by Judith Fox

Here’s a review of the show by Robert Cortlandt:

Next on to Fifty Crows in their new space (which personally I found rather dark) . They’re showing Judith Fox’s new work I Still Do. An exceptionally moving show of photographs about her husband as he struggles with Alzheimer’s. It is a very intimate and personal look. One thing about documentary photography, for me at least, is that struggle for access where I am reaching for the intimate. She seems to have achieved that fine line of revelation that doesn’t feel like intrusion. The feeling in her book is exactly what I want to achieve in my doc. projects.  

I’m attaching a few photographs from the trip and from the show.  I also want to share with you a photograph I took at the lovely Yerba Buena Park on the one day it didn’t rain.

 

copyright by Judith Fox

 

copyright by Judith Fox

 

copyright by Judith Fox

 

copyright by Judith Fox

 

copyright by Judith Fox

 

copyright by Judith Fox

Unintended Irony at Disneyland

I just returned from Anaheim, California where I gave the keynote address at the Alzheimer’s Association Memory Walk Awards and Recognition Dinner.  It was a great event, with energetic and inspirational people who care very much about increasing awareness of AD and creating change.  But I found an unintended irony in the setting for the event—Disneyland.

Walt Disney’s world is a fantasy, of course.  A very clean, polite, stage-managed fantasy.  No trash, no dying flowers, no peeling paint, no unhappy employees  cast members.  In this hyper-controlled environment, we were talking about a disease that is currently beyond our control.  We were discussing a disease that’s messy, that causes decay, that runs amuck.  Even though I want to see a world without Alzheimer’s, I don’t want  a world without the unexpected or  unanticipated.  Life with disease and death is tough—but there are also riches and growth and precious moments that arrive when they’re least expected and unplanned.  There can be pain—but also beauty—in our human vulnerabilities and fragilities. And a flower can be glorious even when it’s faded.

So, in an odd way, I was glad that it was literally raining on our parade and on the hall in which the dinner was held. And when I looked out the resort window, I was perversely pleased to see the palm trees moving in the wind and rain and almost obscuring the large billboards that proclaimed “Fun in the Sun for Everyone” and “Just another day in Paradise.”  There are some things even Disney can’t control.

copyright 2010. Judith Fox

Rain in Sunny California

Seems it never rains in sunny California … but girl, don’t they warn ya?  It pours, man, it pours.

It’s been pouring for the better part of three days now, and we’re cranky.  Until this week, the only use my umbrella got was when I headed east.  I know I’m spoiled, you don’t have to tell me.  But I’ll confess:  as inconvenient as the rain is for me, and as seriously difficult it is for others in SoCal, there’s something about it that I like now and then.  And, if you’ll excuse me, I’ve got a book to read and a fireplace to light.

copyright Judith Fox

2010

I wish you and your families a healthy 2010—and a year filled with joyous moments.

Edge of the Sea. by Judith Fox

© Copyright Judith Fox. All rights reserved.