Global Conversations about AD

What was so exciting about speaking at the ADI conference in Greece (Alzheimer’s Disease International)—in addition to the programs and the vibrant city of Thessaloniki—was the opportunity to talk with other participants and hear about AD programs throughout the world.  I spoke with people from Iran, the Netherlands, Israel, New Zealand, Australia, Puerto Rico, Ireland, the UK and many other countries.   The interactions were inspiring, particularly since there’s attention being paid globally to AD that we in the U.S. can emulate.

And, speaking of inspiring, there is a television commercial from the U.K. that has wowed me.  It’s very simple—just a single dementia patient standing against a white background and talking about having—and living—with AD.  The message is: don’t run away from me, or fear me, when I tell you I have dementia.  I’m a real person, with thoughts and feelings, and here I am.  Why don’t we have similar spots in the U.S.?  I’m going to be asking that question of influential people in the field when I get back to the U.S.

I was thrilled with the response to my photographs and my book I Still Do: Loving and Living with Alzheimer’s.  My presentation centered around my experiences caring for my husband, Ed, and the power of art to help people understand viscerally, and to relate to, those experiences and to connect with my husband’s story.  By extension, viewers and readers understand better the layers of the AD journey.

In the meantime, I’m enjoying the friendly people of Greece and will share some photographs when I get home.

The City by the Bay

I just came back from five days in San Francisco, where I went to attend the opening of an exhibition of my work I Still Do and Sea of Dreams.

copyright by Judith Fox

Here’s a review of the show by Robert Cortlandt:

Next on to Fifty Crows in their new space (which personally I found rather dark) . They’re showing Judith Fox’s new work I Still Do. An exceptionally moving show of photographs about her husband as he struggles with Alzheimer’s. It is a very intimate and personal look. One thing about documentary photography, for me at least, is that struggle for access where I am reaching for the intimate. She seems to have achieved that fine line of revelation that doesn’t feel like intrusion. The feeling in her book is exactly what I want to achieve in my doc. projects.  

I’m attaching a few photographs from the trip and from the show.  I also want to share with you a photograph I took at the lovely Yerba Buena Park on the one day it didn’t rain.

 

copyright by Judith Fox

 

copyright by Judith Fox

 

copyright by Judith Fox

 

copyright by Judith Fox

 

copyright by Judith Fox

 

copyright by Judith Fox

Art Changes us

I was going to write about another suggestion for coping with AD, and then decided against it.  Alzheimer’s is a significant part of my world and my life, but it’s not the only part.  I’ve been thinking a lot about my photography and writing (which, admittedly, have helped me cope with Ed’s Alzheimer’s) and the part art plays in our lives, if we’re open to it.  I’ve been thinking about the ways in which art can change our world and our way of seeing our surroundings.  I’ve been thinking about specific painters and photographers and musicians and the riches they’ve given me—even when their work has disturbed and challenged me.  And I’ve been thinking about how grateful I am to have the ability and desire to express myself through photography and writing.  I’ve been thinking, too, how I hope that each of us has the good fortune to use whatever creative talents we have to nurture ourselves and the people we love—whether we cook, or garden or dance or weave.   And, in indulging our more creative ambitions, we will find new ways to cope with AD—or whatever challenges we’re faced with.

I’m attaching a photograph from my book and photography series I Still Do; I hope you enjoy it.

copyright 2006. Judith Fox

Ask for Help

When caregivers ask me for advice, one of the things I suggest is that they ask for help.  And to ask for specific help.  I can say this with the deep conviction that comes from experience;  it took me eight years to ask anyone for help.

These were some of the voices in my head which held me back:  I should be able to do everything myself; if someone wants to help, they’ll offer to do so;  I don’t want to feel obligated.  And then there’s “I can stay by myself, I don’t need a babysitter.”  Sorry, that last voice wasn’t in my head but coming from my husband’s mouth.  So, between my unwillingness to ask for assistance and Ed’s unwillingness to let anyone but me care for him,  I waited 2920 days before asking Ed’s children to stay with him for a week so I could take some time off.

When someone says to you “What can I do”—tell them.  “Would you please stay with my wife on Monday afternoon so I can have lunch with friends?”   “Would you take my mother to lunch tomorrow so I can get my hair cut?” “Will you stay with your grandfather for the weekend so dad and I can get away?”  Time off is energizing—don’t wait eight years to find out.

Survival Strategies

I’ve been asked many times how I’ve coped with caring for Ed during the past 12 years.  There’s no one answer that fits all (just as there’s no one size that fits all), but over the next couple of weeks I’ll share some strategies that have helped me.     I won’t address them in any particular order—at different moments and during different disease stages, they vary in their value.  Please let me know which issues concern you, and I’ll be happy to try to address them.

There are some survival strategies that I’ve learned—or relearned—that improve my communications with everyone in my life.  For example, don’t take the behavior personally.  You know that silverware that your mother put in her closet?  She didn’t put it there to drive you crazy.   And when Ed’s wallet disappeared for two weeks before turning up in a rarely-worn shoe, he didn’t put it there because he likes to watch me tear the house apart.  And when your wife decided to stay in her bathrobe and you missed your doctor’s appointment, it wasn’t about you.  Sure, the frustrating behavior is being done by them and it’s affecting you—but the AD patient is trying to deal with their topsy-turvy world as best they can.  Their behavior makes sense to them at the time.  So don’t take it personally.

Learning to relax in the face of confounding behaviors I can’t control is a healthy way for me to live—whether I’m dealing with someone with AD or with the security lines at the airports.  It’s not personal, it’s not personal, it’s not personal …

Unintended Irony at Disneyland

I just returned from Anaheim, California where I gave the keynote address at the Alzheimer’s Association Memory Walk Awards and Recognition Dinner.  It was a great event, with energetic and inspirational people who care very much about increasing awareness of AD and creating change.  But I found an unintended irony in the setting for the event—Disneyland.

Walt Disney’s world is a fantasy, of course.  A very clean, polite, stage-managed fantasy.  No trash, no dying flowers, no peeling paint, no unhappy employees  cast members.  In this hyper-controlled environment, we were talking about a disease that is currently beyond our control.  We were discussing a disease that’s messy, that causes decay, that runs amuck.  Even though I want to see a world without Alzheimer’s, I don’t want  a world without the unexpected or  unanticipated.  Life with disease and death is tough—but there are also riches and growth and precious moments that arrive when they’re least expected and unplanned.  There can be pain—but also beauty—in our human vulnerabilities and fragilities. And a flower can be glorious even when it’s faded.

So, in an odd way, I was glad that it was literally raining on our parade and on the hall in which the dinner was held. And when I looked out the resort window, I was perversely pleased to see the palm trees moving in the wind and rain and almost obscuring the large billboards that proclaimed “Fun in the Sun for Everyone” and “Just another day in Paradise.”  There are some things even Disney can’t control.

copyright 2010. Judith Fox

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